GENERAL LUCIUS D. CLAY ARMED FORCES RESERVE CENTER

NATIONAL GUARD JOINT HEADQUARTERS
Dobbins ARB, Marietta, GA

FDG recently completed programming, preliminary and comprehensive architectural design services to the Georgia Department of Defense, Georgia National Guard, and the National Guard Bureau for the new Joint Forces Headquarters at the Gen Lucius D. Clay National Guard Center. This new facility consolidates command and control elements for the Georgia Army National Guard and Air National Guard into one location. The center combines administrative, tactical operations, and central command functions with more standard armory and support spaces for vehicles, weaponry, and related materials.  The new facility is a one-of-a-kind military headquarters using state-of-the-art construction techniques and high tech features.

The Joint Forces Headquarters Building stretches more than 565 ft along the southwest corner of the base. The three story structure incorporates a 7,228 square foot assembly area, and more than 9,500 square feet of IT support space. Another unique feature of the building is the more than 3,000 square feet of acoustically designed rehearsal space for the 116th Band. The large facility also houses a full kitchen capable of serving three meals a day for 500 soldiers.

Originally at $28 million, the budget grew to $48 million. The final construction cost due to the current economic times came in at $28.5 million. The project was programmed for approximately 214,000 SF as a Joint Command Readiness Center. In response to changes in the Department of Defense and Homeland Security requirements, the facility was reprogrammed with additional function and improvements. These included upgrades to the Emergency Command Center, higher security for the centralized IT Department, and more integrated Joint Operations Center for all of the services of the Georgia National Guard.  The net result of these changes is a more comprehensive and integrated facility. The facility also incorporates a Georgia National Guard History Center display and a corridor view mural.

Because this facility serves as the Georgia Military Command, Control, and Communications Center, security is a major concern. Electronic security measures included cameras, access control systems, and intrusion sensors. Physical security measures included a gate guard, anti-vehicular barriers, high-visibility lighting, and setbacks from entry roads and the base perimeter. The facility will also be fully wired to support computer LAN/WAN monitoring systems. The facility achieved LEED Silver Certification by the U.S. Green Building Council in late 2012.